Academic journal article Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Air Pollution

Academic journal article Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Air Pollution

Article excerpt

WHO estimates that some 7 million people die every year from exposure to fine airborne particles that are carried into the lungs and cardiovascular system, causing stroke, heart disease, lung cancer, respiratory conditions and other diseases.

Air pollution levels remain dangerously high in many parts of the world, with 9 out of every 10 people breathing air containing high levels of pollutants, according to new data released by WHO last month.

Ambient (outdoor) air pollution alone caused some 4.2 million deaths in 2016, while household air pollution generated from cooking with polluting fuels and technologies caused an estimated 3.8 million deaths in the same period. About 1 million of these deaths were caused by both indoor and outdoor pollution.

Over the past 6 years, WHO estimates show ambient air pollution levels have remained high and relatively stable, with declining concentrations in some parts of Europe and the Americas.

The highest ambient air pollution levels are in the Eastern Mediterranean Region and in South-East Asia, with annual mean levels often exceeding more than five times WHO limits, followed by low- and middle-income cities in Africa and the Western Pacific. …

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