Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

The May Review

Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

The May Review

Article excerpt

To a jobseeker--whether for one's fast gig, for advancement within an established career, or for reemployment after one's career is interrupted--nothing is more important than occupational information. What is the nature of the work? What are working conditions like? What qualifications and training do I need? What's the outlook for employment in the field? How do earnings in the job stack up?

For half a century now, the Occupational Outlook Handbook has helped answer these questions. Harold Goldstein takes us back even further to the research program started with a modest appropriation in 1940 for "carrying on an occupational outlook service." As the end of the Second World War approached, the Veterans Administration (VA) realized that returning veterans would need solid information on employment opportunities. Occupational analysts at BLS responded with a great variety of brief reports on specific jobs--a collection of which was literally bound together with shoelaces as VA Manual M7-1, Occupational Outlook Information. M7-1 was used in VA centers throughout the United States and at hundreds of bases overseas to counsel millions of veterans.

In 1949, an updated and expanded version of the manual was made available for public sale under the title still used today: Occupational Outlook Handbook. …

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