Academic journal article Folklore

The Folklore of Tameside: Myths and Legends

Academic journal article Folklore

The Folklore of Tameside: Myths and Legends

Article excerpt

The Folklore of Tameside: Myths and Legends (inside, called The Folklore of Tameside: The Ashton and Longdendale Lordships). By John Walker and Michael Nevell. Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council with the Manchester University Archaeological Unit, 1998. ISBN 1 871324 21 1

The constituency I represent roughly follows the course of the River Tame beginning in the centre of Stockport, then crossing into Tameside, and ending almost in Stalybridge. The Borough of Tameside was created in 1974 out of eight-and-a half small towns--the local joke is that each township considers itself to be the half--and locals still consider themselves to be residents of Ashton-under-Lyne or Dukinfield, or one of the other townships, rather than Tameside. This has been a problem for planners and the providers of services; so, to try to get people thinking corporately and create a unified sense of place, the Borough Council commissioned a set of local histories.

This volume is the last in the series, and the only one with overtly folkloric contents. Earlier volumes covered subjects such as: Tameside Before 1066; Tameside 1700-1930; The People Who Made Tameside; Buildings of Tameside; and so on. …

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