Academic journal article Sarmatian Review

From the Editor

Academic journal article Sarmatian Review

From the Editor

Article excerpt

Christina Manetti's article demonstrates that Polish discourse has come of age: it has become capable of criticizing itself. Specifically, it has begun to note that the self-congratulatory attitudes which some World War II survivors assumed were not entirely justified. The reference here is to such stories as Jan Jozef Szczepanski's "Boots" published in Tygodnik Powszechny in 1947. At that time Polish discourse began to note that victims could also be perpetrators while remaining victims; that survivors can be perpetrators. Of course the timing of "Boots" was wrong: the story was published at a time when far more significant crimes were being committed on Polish soil by the Soviet occupiers and their collaborators--some of whom had been, again, victims.

The ability to make these fine distinctions is a sign of a discourse coming of age. It is significant that in Poland, this coming of age occurred in a Catholic weekly, however restricted its Catholic capabilities were by the Soviet occupiers.

Kevin Hannan's essay on Polish Catholicism is remarkable for several reasons. First, it is written by a Texan rather than a Varsovian or a Cracovian. Second, it incorporates Dr. Hannan's knowledge of several Slavic cultures and several branches of Christianity. Third, it contains some unique insights, such as that of the largely suppressed story of how the Council of Florence and its decrees were initially accepted in Muscovite Russia, and then rejected owing to the tsars' desire for power. …

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