Academic journal article Academy of Accounting and Financial Studies Journal

Blended Learning and Accounting Education in Kuwait: An Analysis of Social Construction of Technology

Academic journal article Academy of Accounting and Financial Studies Journal

Blended Learning and Accounting Education in Kuwait: An Analysis of Social Construction of Technology

Article excerpt

INTRODUCTION

In an attempt to reduce the cost of higher education for both the learners and the providers, as well as amidst growing demand for the education, blended learning has been considered as the way to go (Chen and Jones, 2008; Ying and Yang, 2017; Delany et al., 2015; O'Keefe et al., 2014). In addition, there are several challenges of the traditional classroom-based and online learning methodologies (Poon, 2013; Jeffrey et al., 2014). Blended learning is a mixture of both classroom-based and online learning strategies (Kistow, 201; Ying and Yang, 2017). Blended learning is intended to mediate between the challenges of the traditional classroom and online/web-based learning (Lalima and Dangwal, 2017; Du, 2011; Grabinski, et al., 2015).

A number of institutions have embraced the advancement in technologies to adopt and implement blended learning with a number of benefits and challenges (Lopez-Perez et al., 2011; Alebaikan, 2010; Grabinski et al., 2015). For instance, Lopez-Perez et al. (2011) revealed that blended learning had a positive effect of reducing drop-out rates and improved exam results of students. Likewise, Alebaikan (2010) argues that blended learning provided flexibility to Saudi female students who had to improve on their academic qualifications without having to abdicate their cultural and traditional roles as married women in an Arabic setting (Grabinski et al., 2015). Grabinski et al., (2015) revealed that blended learning provided flexible learning at any place and any time in Poland and that it saved time for students of having to commute from time to time to their institutions. They could study from anywhere, thus reducing the cost of education (Lalima and Dangwal, 2017).

The adoption and implementation of blended learning often poses challenges (Ying and Yang, 2017; Jeffrey et al., 2014). It was noted by Ying and Yang (2017) that most academics considered blended learning as new to them and they had fears that technology would eventually substitute their efforts in the learning process. Likewise, Jeffrey et al. (2014) observed that the teachers were resisting blended learning due to inadequate training and insufficient IT skills to create learning content that could be posted on the Web (Ying and Yang, 2017). Notwithstanding, there are institutions which have employed blended learning in the delivery of accounting courses, but mainly in developed countries with relatively developed infrastructure (Chen and Jones, 2008; Poon, 2013; Bowyer and Chambers, 2017). There are limited researches on the adoption and implementation of blended learning in developing countries, in general and specifically in the delivery of accounting education (Grabinski et al., 2015; Kistow, 2011; Suhail, et al., 2013).

This study therefore is intended to add to extant literature by applying a SCOT framework to study the prospects and challenges of blended learning in HEIs, with particular focus on accounting education, in Kuwait as perceived by different relevant social groups and their perception of the technological frame of blended learning. It develops a tripartite model of studying the introduction and use of blended learning as a "new" artifact based on the interpretive flexibility of the relevant social groups in particular those in accounting education in Kuwait and their perception of the technological frame of blended learning. The rest of the paper is divided into 4 sections. Section 2 presents the theoretical constructs of SCOT and prior studies. Section 3 provides the methodology used to collect the data for the study. Section 4 presents the findings of the study and Section 5 provides a conclusion.

Theoretical Constructs and Prior Studies

Social construction of technology (SCOT)

Social Construction of Technology (SCOT) provides a theoretical insight into the adoption and implementation of "new" technologies in a social context (Prell, 2009; Jones & Bissell, 2011; Kline & Pinch, 1996), like HEIs. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.