Academic journal article Wordsworth Circle

From the Editor

Academic journal article Wordsworth Circle

From the Editor

Article excerpt

This first issue of The Wordsworth Circle published by the University of Chicago Press continues the great narrative begun in 1970: a journal of record to reflect and record all the concepts and practices a global community of scholars considers to be Romantic Studies. The journal took Wordsworth's name because his life, works, and associations from his birth in 1770 to his death in 1850 reflect all that influenced, impinged on, or expressed the cultural period considered to be Romanticism. The incomplete circle that became our logo conveys the unfinished universal conversation that Wordsworth envisioned long before the digital world: the "Poet," he said, in the most inclusive sense, "is the rock of defence for human nature; an upholder and preserver, carrying everywhere with him relationship and love. In spite of difference of soil and climate, of language and manners, of laws and customs: in spite of things silently gone out of mind, and things violently destroyed; the Poet binds together by passion and knowledge the vast empire of human society, as it is spread over the whole earth, and over all time" (Preface to Lyrical Ballads, 1800).

Appropriately, we begin the next fifty years of The Wordsworth Circle with a collection called "Romantic Theories of Life: Between Living and Nonliving," guest edited by Noah Heringman and Richard C. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.