Academic journal article The Science Teacher

Evaluating Advertising Claims Past and Present

Academic journal article The Science Teacher

Evaluating Advertising Claims Past and Present

Article excerpt

Are crackers really more nutritious than fish? A 1917 Sunshine Biscuits advertisement from The Tulsa Daily World seems to imply as much, stating: "In these days you should know, in a general way at least, which foods provide the most nourishment. The following table, taken from a report of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, will give you a general idea of the energy value of various staple foods and how they compare with crackers."

The accompanying table ranks various foods in terms of "Calories of Energy Per Pound." Crackers, not surprisingly, deliver more energy value than any other food listed: over twice as much as sirloin beef, three times as much as eggs, and six times as much as fish!

Invite students to analyze the ad and practice their science media literacy skills. Students might ask: Who produced this ad copy, and for what purpose? To what extent is "energy value" (also known as "food value") a legitimate proxy for nutritional value? Is comparing different food types "per pound" a helpful comparison? What did scientists and government agencies actually recommend regarding nutrition in 1917? Does this ad accurately represent current research? …

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