Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Comparisons of Worksite Health Screening Participants and Nonparticipants in a University Setting

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Comparisons of Worksite Health Screening Participants and Nonparticipants in a University Setting

Article excerpt

Rodney Bowden, Stephen F. Austin State University

Health screening volunteers in a university setting are generally different that a sample that has been randomly generated. Volunteer participants are more likely to be faculty or managerial staff positions due to their job flexibility. The purpose of this study was to compare volunteer health screening participants to a randomly selected group of university employees to see if in fact demographic differences existed. All benefits-eligible faculty and staff (9,291 employees) of a large southern university (Texas A&M University) were invited to participate in worksite health screening. Approximately 15 employees were scheduled for each screening date. Walk-ins were allowed at the health assessment site as space allowed. The health promotion program screened 14% (n = 1400) of benefits-eligible faculty and staff at Texas A&M University. The sample was reduced to 2.7% (n = 270) of the benefits-eligible faculty and staff after eliminating those participants who did not complete all assessment procedures. Screened employees were compared to a random sample of university employees who gave permission for their health claims to be released in order to examine the bias associated with volunteering for screening. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.