Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Video-Modeling of a Self-Paced Task: Attentional Considerations

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Video-Modeling of a Self-Paced Task: Attentional Considerations

Article excerpt

Derek de la Pena, Christopher M. Janelle Christopher J. Hass, and S. Rebecca Ellis, University of Florida

The efficacy of using different model types for teaching a novel motor skill was the focus of the present investigation. Fifteen female students (M = 20.0 years) served as participants and were randomly assigned to three conditions based on model characteristics: point-light, stick figure, and full body. The purpose of the study was twofold. First, of interest was to identify optimal model characteristics. It was hypothesized that a stick-figure model would be a better mode for teaching a self-paced novel skill than a point-light or full-body model. A stick figure model, unlike a point-light model, contains pertinent biomechanical information (i.e., relative angles, etc.) needed to successfully replicate the particular skill in question (a basketball free-throw), while eliminating potential distracters of a full-body model. The second purpose was to determine whether successful learners would exhibit different visual search patterns than individuals who were less successful. Robust differences have been found between experts and novices in a variety of sport contexts with respect to visual search patterns. However, the majority of studies have examined performance of an already existing skill. As a result, little is currently known regarding how attentional focus may differ during the learning process. …

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