Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Lateralized Effects on Reaching by Children

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Lateralized Effects on Reaching by Children

Article excerpt

Carl Gabbard and Casi Rabb, Texas A&M University, and Vicki Gentry, Northwestern State University

A central issue in motor behavior is understanding what constitutes, drives and affects a motor program for a given action. Complementing this inquiry is a reasonable assumption that for actions requiring manual control, specific limb specification (right or left hand) may be critical to optimal performance. From this perspective, the present investigation was motivated by the suggestion that there are behavioral differences in individuals due to variation in cerebral asymmetry associated with handedness. Although debate continues, there is a rather convincing body of evidence suggesting that a typical group of left-handers are more variable and less lateralized in various aspects of functional asymmetric behavior compared to right-handers. We examined this premise in 5-to 7-year-olds using one of the most basic of motor behaviors, reaching in hemispace. Limb selection profiles of right-and left-handers (N = 114) were observed in response to stimuli presented in various positions of hemispace. An underlying q uestion focused on the use of attentional information in motor programming for reaching movements. …

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