Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

The Effectiveness of Traditional, Theory-Based versus Alternative, Pedagogical Content Knowledge-Based Exercise Physiology Courses at Delivering Exercise Physiology Content Knowledge to Physical Education Teacher Education Students

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

The Effectiveness of Traditional, Theory-Based versus Alternative, Pedagogical Content Knowledge-Based Exercise Physiology Courses at Delivering Exercise Physiology Content Knowledge to Physical Education Teacher Education Students

Article excerpt

Sean M. Bulger, Derek J. Mohr, Michael A. Graves, and Robert L. Wiegand, West Virginia University

Exercise physiology has long been considered a critical component of the physical education teacher education (PETE) curriculum. The practical implications of the theoretical knowledge base in exercise physiology relate directly to sport performance, exercise program design, interpretation of research findings, advocacy of fitness, and so forth (Van Donselaar and Leslie, 1990). While courses in exercise physiology have been previously identified as one of the PETE student's primary sources of knowledge regarding the physiological responses of the body to physical activity (Mood, 1971), a number of authors have questioned the appropriateness of traditional instructional methods in the subdiscipline of exercise physiology (Karper, 1997; Kelley and Lindsay, 1980; Siedentop, 1972; Van Donselaar and Leslie, 1990; Verner, 1991). The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of traditional, theory based versus alternative, pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) based exercise physiology courses in deliveri ng exercise physiology content knowledge to PETE students. The participating students were enrolled in one of the following courses for a semester: (a) a traditional exercise physiology course instructed by an exercise physiologist (n = 40 exercise physiology students and n = 10 PETE students), (b) an alternative, PCK based exercise physiology course instructed by a physical education teacher educator (n = 42 PETE students), or (c) an introduction to physical education course that served as a control group and received no instruction in exercise physiology (n = 55 PETE students). …

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