Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Accuracy of Self-Appraisal of Ability and Motivational Beliefs of Children in Physical Education

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Accuracy of Self-Appraisal of Ability and Motivational Beliefs of Children in Physical Education

Article excerpt

Melissa A. Chase, Miami University

The accuracy with which children assess their own physical ability can influence their motivation and future behavior. Research has found that as children age they become more accurate in their estimates of competence and boys more than girls tend to overestimate their ability (Horn and Weiss, 1991; Kaley and Cloutier, 1984). Bandura (1997) stated that overestimation of ability, if not too unrealistic, could be advantageous. However, extreme overestimation can lead to potentially dangerous situations and extreme underestimations can lead to restrictions in activity. The purpose of this study was to examine age and gender differences in children's perceptions of ability in physical education and to determine how those estimates relate to motivational intentions. Two hundred and eighty-nine children ranging in age from 8 to 14 years, from three school districts in the Midwest participated in this study. Children completed measures for perceived competence, intended effort and persistence in physical education a nd sport skills. The children's physical education teacher (N = 8) completed ratings of actual competence in physical education and sport skills for each child. The teacher's ratings and child's rating were subtracted to assess the child's accuracy of self-appraisal of ability. Results indicated there was an age by gender interaction for children's accuracy of self-appraisal of ability. …

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