Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

The Contribution of Physical Education to Children's Current Physical Activity

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

The Contribution of Physical Education to Children's Current Physical Activity

Article excerpt

T. L. McKenzie, P. K Strikmiller, L. S. Webber M. Yang, H. A. Feldman, E.J. Stone, S. H. Kelder, and C. L. Perry, San Diego State University

Regular physical activity provides both immediate and long-term health benefits, and physical education (PE) has the promotion of physical activity as one goal. Little is known, however, about how physical activity time during PE relates to children's daily activity accrual. Over a 4-year period we assessed contexts in which a large (N= 3168) geographically (CA, 24%; LA, 26%; MN, 27%; TX, 23%) and ethnically diverse (White, 73%; Hispanic, 14%; Black, 12%) cohort accrued physical activity. Participants were from the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) cohort originally recruited from 96 elementary schools. Each spring from fifth through eighth grades, the cohort completed the Self-Administered Physical Activity Checklist (SAPAC), a validated instrument with activity measures correlating significantly with heart rate monitoring (r = .60). At each administration, participants reported the number of minutes they spent in various physical activities (including chores, sports, games, and ex ercise) before, during, and after school on the previous day. Activities were grouped into intensity categories by MET values: light ([less than] 4.5 METS), moderate (4.5 to 6.0 METS), and vigorous ([greater than] 6. …

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