Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Confidence as a Source of Expectancy Information: A Replication

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Confidence as a Source of Expectancy Information: A Replication

Article excerpt

Gloria B. Solomon, Texas Christian University

Expectancy theory is a framework utilized to explain the effects of coach expectations on communicated behavior and subsequent athlete performance. Specifically, through personal cues, such as gender and height, and performance cues, such as past performance and effort, coaches develop expectations of their athletes. Research has demonstrated that coaches offer more feedback and better quality feedback to their high expectancy athletes, while low expectancy athletes are afforded fewer communication opportunities. Solomon (1998) extended this theory by testing the utility of personality cues as a source of expectancy information. Results showed that head coaches employ perceptions of athlete confidence as a source of expectancy information. Furthermore, coaches' expectation of athlete confidence was the only significant predictor of actual athlete performance. Performance cues, such as perceptions of athlete ability, and athletes' perception of their own level of confidence did not serve to predict actual athl ete performance. This was an interesting finding in lieu of the abundance of research documenting links between athlete performance and confidence (DeFrancesco and Burke, 1997; Krane and Williams, 1994; Pickens, Rotella, and Gansneder, 1996). The purpose of this investigation was to replicate Solomon's study that extended expectancy theory using the same group of coaches. …

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