Academic journal article Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Less-Used Vaccines against Major Diseases Are Cost-Effective, Researchers Conclude

Academic journal article Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Less-Used Vaccines against Major Diseases Are Cost-Effective, Researchers Conclude

Article excerpt

It is widely accepted that the "traditional" children's vaccines -- such as those against poliomyelitis, diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus -- are a highly cost-effective way to improve health. In contrast, many governments have been deterred from introducing newer vaccines against major diseases, such as hepatitis B or the common pneumonia-causing organism Haemophilus influenzae B (Hib), into their national immunization programmes because of their higher costs. Now, however, a study has shown that these newer vaccines are cost-effective in most low-income and middle-income countries.

When considering the cost-effectiveness of different health interventions, researchers have assessed how much a given intervention will cost per year of healthy life that it will buy. For example, the traditional children's vaccines against poliomyelitis, diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, which are given together within WHO's Expanded Programme on Immunization, have been estimated to cost between about US$ 20 and US$ 40 per year of healthy life saved (or per disability-adjusted life year, or DALY, averted).(a) The World Bank has suggested that in any particular country, health interventions are cost-effective if they buy a year of healthy life for less than the national average per-capita gross domestic product (GDP); many health interventions, such as hospital treatments for some noncommunicable diseases, cost much more than the average per-capita GDP per DALY. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.