Academic journal article Law and Policy in International Business

Dedication to Walter Hollis and Ambassador Julius L. Katz

Academic journal article Law and Policy in International Business

Dedication to Walter Hollis and Ambassador Julius L. Katz

Article excerpt

For a quarter-century, starting at Annecy in 1948, Walter Hollis served as the State Department's trade lawyer--handling international trade negotiations; interpreting U.S. trade law, GATT, and other trade agreements; and advising regarding GATT disputes. He was the equivalent of what has now become USTR's Office of the General Counsel.

Walter Hollis grew up in Western Massachusetts. He attended Columbia Law School, where he became interested in international law. The idea to which Walter Hollis devoted his legal career was uniquely American--that an open, rules-based trading system, based on principles of non-discrimination, progressive liberalization of tariffs, and rule of law could help support global peace and prosperity.

Mr. Hollis believed strongly in the GATT system and he helped build it through his work on successive rounds of multilateral trade negotiations. He never tailored his views or his legal advice to the political winds. His knowledge of GATT law and practice was profound. He was a man of few words, but he made those words count, and he could be relied upon for straightforward, honest advice. After retiring from the State Department, he served for many years as a consultant to USTR. Every morning, he would appear, lugging a battered black briefcase, and work on GATT-related matters at USTR. After lunch, he would walk to the State Department Library where he spent countless hours researching U.S. trade agreements.

It was our privilege to work with Mr. Hollis and to benefit from his profound knowledge of the GATT system.

Ambassador Julius L. Katz served the United States as Deputy U.S. Trade Representative from 1989 to 1993 and in a variety of positions at the Department of State from 1950 to 1980, including Assistant Secretary of State for Economic and Business Affairs. His commitment to the economic and political benefits of trade grew out of his experiences in the invasion of Normandy and the Battle of the Bulge, and extended to the most important trade negotiations of his time, including the Kennedy, Tokyo and Uruguay Rounds in the GATT; NAFTA (for which he was the chief U. …

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