Academic journal article The Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology

Culture and Co-Residence: An Exploration of Variation in Home-Returning among Canadian Young Adults [*]

Academic journal article The Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology

Culture and Co-Residence: An Exploration of Variation in Home-Returning among Canadian Young Adults [*]

Article excerpt

Cet article s'inscrit dans la lign[acute{e}]e des [acute{e}]tudes sur les dimensions culturelles de la cohabitation entre g[acute{e}]n[acute{e}]rations en examinant de pr[grave{e}s le comportement des jeunes adultes canadiens qui retournent vivre chez leurs parents. Nous explorons les rapports mutuels entre la famille et la diversit[acute{e}] culturelle, entre le capital financier et le capital social, et entre le rythme et les m[acute{e}]canismes de transitions pr[acute{e}]coces qui se manifestent au cours d'une vie. Les mod[grave{e}]els de hasards proportionnels sont appliqu[acute{e}]s [grave{a}] un sous-[acute{e}]chantillon de 2 549 jeunes adultes, [hat{e}]g[acute{e}]s de 19 [grave{a}] 34 ans, en tenant compte des donn[acute{e}]es de l'Enqu[hat{e}]te sociale g[acute{e}]n[acute{e}]rale, cycle 10, de 1995. L'une des principales conclusions tir[acute{e}]es ici indique que les jeunes qui sont de langue maternelle anglaise sont beaucoup plus susceptibles de retourner chez leurs parents apr[grave{e}]s un premier d[acute{e}]part que ceux dont Ia langue maternelle est le francais ou une autre langue. Les autres variables qui entrent enjeu sont le niveau d'[acute{e}]ducation du p[grave{e}]re, le nombre de fr[grave{e}]res et de smurs, le sexe, l'[hat{a}]ge au moment du d[acute{e}]part de la maison et la raison de ce d[acute{e}]part. L'article aborde aussi les questions des responsabilit[acute{e}]s et des r[hat{o}]les des parents autour de la cinquantaine, et de la socialisation au sein de la famille au cours de la vie.

This article offers a focussed examination of variation in homereturning behaviour among Canadian young adults. Framed within the life course perspective, we explore the interrelationships among family and cultural diversity, financial and social capital, and the timing and pathways of early transitions. Proportional hazards analyses are performed on a subsample of 2,549 young adults aged 19-34, using data from the 1995 General Social Survey, Cycle 10. A major finding is that those whose mother tongue is English are significantly more likely to return to the parental home than those with French or "other" mother tongues. Other variables include: father's education, number of siblings, gender, age at home-leaving, and initial reason for home-leaving. Implications for midlife parental roles and responsibilities, and for family socialization are discussed.

AT THE THRESHOLD OF THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY, profound transformations are occurring in family life. Notably, changes accompanied by "modernity" in advanced industrial societies have affected the timing, nature, and contexts of family-related life course transitions. In previous decades, young adults typically left the parental home by their early twenties upon the completion of school or at the time of marriage, acquiring "full-adult" status, rights, and responsibilities. Since the early 1980s, however, there has been an extension of young adulthood in North America and many European countries (e.g., Cherlin et al., 1997). Indeed, today's generation of youth has been described as "on hold," since its "complete" transition to adulthood has become prolonged, often well into the twenties and early thirties (C[hat{o}]t[acute{e}] and Allahar, 1994). As a result, midlife parenthood can involve periods of co-residence with young adult children who remain in, or return to, the parental home (Boyd and Norris, 1998).

One challenge facing family sociologists is to understand the diverse ways in which middle-generation family households and parent and adult-child roles are responding to widespread cultural and socio-economic change in Canadian society (McDaniel, 1996). In particular, there is little knowledge pertaining to how ethnocultural, socio-economic and family environmental factors affect specific forms of intergenerational coresidence, such as returning to the parental home. Although Boyd (1998) documents strong cultural and ethnic group differences in the propensity for young adults to live at home in Canada, her data are limited to broad co-resident patterns. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.