Academic journal article The Hastings Center Report

Don't Let My Baby Be like Me

Academic journal article The Hastings Center Report

Don't Let My Baby Be like Me

Article excerpt

Don't Let My Baby Be Like Me Paul G. lives in a small town over three hours' drive from the nearest major city. As a young child he was taken to a hospital in the city because o his grossly deformed hands and arms and his repeated passage of large, bloody stools. He had nearly died from the hemorrhaging and had required several transfusions. While at the hospital his family learned that Paul was afflicted with TAR, radial aplasia thrombocytopenia syndrome. The bleeding was caused by his low platelet count, but in most patients with TAR this is only a problem in early infancy. None of his relatives who had been similarly affected has survived past infancy, although there were suspicious that some of the children might have had greater efforts been made to obtain treatment for them. The doctors said that the syndrome was inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion and that the intramarriage of family members in the isolated town had contributed to the high frequency of the syndrome in Paul's family.

Paul had returned home, but from his perspective he led a miserable life. The bones in his lower arms were missing and he could grasp nothing securely in either hand. He could feed himself only with the greatest difficulty. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.