Academic journal article Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Survey of Malaria Treatment and Deaths

Academic journal article Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Survey of Malaria Treatment and Deaths

Article excerpt

Sir -- We read with interest the inquiry into malaria deaths by Durrheim et al. (1). The authors emphasize very pertinent points. Mortality and morbidity in severe falciparum malaria are influenced by various factors, such as the level of transmission, the presence of multiple complications, age, pregnancy, etc. But scant attention has been given to the management of decisions (2). If the duration of illness or of coma is prolonged before a patient receives medical treatment, the prognosis becomes poor.

We conducted an internal audit of the patients treated for falciparum malaria in our industrial hospital, situated in a tribal belt of Orissa in central India. We analysed 901 consecutive patients (195 were under 15 years of age, 371 were aged 15-30 years, and 335 were over 30 years). Chloroquine was administered to 24.61% of the children and 35.55% of the adults ([chi square] test = 8.24, P [is less than] 0.001). Quinine was given as the initial antimalarial drug in 57.6% of all patients (139 children and 380 adults, [chi square] test = 19.6, P [is less than] 0.001). Mortality was lower among the children (1%) than the adults (4.4%.

Stahel et al. have demonstrated that the use of chloroquine has an antagonistic effect on alternative antimalarial drugs (3). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.