Academic journal article Style

Forty-One Questions on the Nature of Narrative [*]

Academic journal article Style

Forty-One Questions on the Nature of Narrative [*]

Article excerpt

1. What is the difference, if any, between narrative, nonnarrative, and antinarrative?

2. Would a text like Robbe-Grillet's La Jalousie be (a) narrative or (an) antinarrative?

3. Is there more than narrative in a narrative?

4. Can an entity be narrative and not be a narrative?

5. Is a narrative a representation?

6. In Benveniste's terms, is a narrative a semiotic entity (one that is recognized as a narrative) or is it a semantic entity (one that is understood as a narrative)?

7. Does every narrative feature the same representational mode (as Genette has insisted)?

8. Is the live television broadcast of a football game (a) narrative?

9. Can a theatrical play be (a) narrative?

10. Should a distinction be made between narrative as the representation of certain types of content, narrative as a mode of representation (featuring an agent recounting something), and narrative as a genre?

11. Is a memory (a) narrative?

12. Is a dream (a) narrative?

13. Is the presentation of one and only one state--"The ball is red," "Mary was happy," "Sally was cool"--(a) narrative?

14. Is the representation of two or more (unconnected or randomly connected) states (a) narrative?

15. Is the representation of otherwise unconnected states in a temporal sequence (a) narrative?

16. What about the representation of temporally sequenced states that are also related in other ways?

17. Is something like "It was warm and then it was cold" (a) narrative?

18. Is the representation of a single process--like "It was raining," "Peter is knitting," "Mary was cooking," or "They were playing cards"--(a) narrative?

19. Is the representation of a single event, a single happening or action, a single change in a state of affairs (a) narrative?

20. Is the representation of mutually contradictory events (a) narrative?

21. Is the representation of two or more (unconnected or randomly connected) nonsimultaneous events (a) narrative?

22. What, to use Harold Mosher's terms, is the difference between narratized description, descriptized narration, and (a) narrative?

23. If(a) narrative is necessarily tied to temporality and the passage of time, do all representations unfolding in time or taking time constitute narrative(s)? …

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