Academic journal article Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Progress Made in Reducing the Number of Landmines Worldwide

Academic journal article Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Progress Made in Reducing the Number of Landmines Worldwide

Article excerpt

The world is starting to embrace a new international norm where it is no longer acceptable to use landmines in armed conflicts, says the International Campaign to Ban Landmines.

The campaign's second annual report, Landmine Monitor Report 2000: Towards a MineFree World, which was released in September at the Second Meeting of States Parties to the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty in Geneva, Switzerland, says nearly three-quarters of the world's nations have signed and/or ratified the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty. The number of known producers of landmines has fallen, from 54 to 16, and trading of landmines appears to have been completely halted, with no known shipments of mines in 1999-2000. Furthermore, over 50 nations have destroyed more than 22 million stockpiled landmines, which includes 10 million since March 1999.

The International Campaign to Ban Landmines is widely credited with being the driving force which led up to the Mine Ban Treaty. In 1997, the campaign received the Nobel Peace Prize for its contribution. Since then, the campaign has set up the Landmine Monitor, which includes a global reporting network, a central database and an annual report.

For the latest report, the group collected information worldwide on landmine ban policies, use, production, transfer, stockpiling, mine clearance, mine awareness, and the assistance given to survivors. …

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