Academic journal article Journal of Secondary Gifted Education

From the Editor's Desk

Academic journal article Journal of Secondary Gifted Education

From the Editor's Desk

Article excerpt

I am pleased to bring you this issue of the Journal of Secondary Gifted Education. We begin the issue with an interview with Joyce Van Tassel-Baska. Joyce is a leading figure in the field of gifted education who speaks and writes widely about a variety of issues within the field. Her more recent work has been in the area of curriculum development for gifted children. The Center for Gifted Education at the College of William and Mary, which Joyce directs, has produced several award-winning curricula in the language arts and science geared specifically for gifted learners.

Joyce offers her insights into the state of the art in gifted education; and, as is apparent from her remarks, the landscape is highly varied. While new theories of giftedness (or rather not so new) have been proposed and research on the efficacy of some practices does exist, practice and theory/research remain largely unaligned and out of synch with one another. This situation attests to the powerful influence of other factors such as political forces that cause schools to continue with practices that are not supported by research. I hope that Joyce's ideas regarding what should exist in terms of services and curriculum for students at each level of schooling are useful to JSGE readers.

The Hebert et al. article presents research on the use of biographies to help gifted girls deal with issues such as low achievement expectations based on gender, gender inequities, and perceived obstacles to achievement. Hebert begins his discussion with profiles of several gifted young women, highlighting both the vulnerabilities of gifted girls and the variety of issues they face in the different contexts in which they live. The literature review in this article will be appreciated by both practitioners and researchers. The information about biographies will be especially useful to teachers and counselors, as is the information on the many ways in which biographies can be used to address the social and emotional issues that gifted girls face

Worrel and his associates present data on the factors that contribute to the continued participation of minority students in a summer enrichment program. Those factors that one would readily predict (i.e., indicators of academic success in the previous summer) did not relate to "returnee" status. The students, who received a special program of social and emotional support, were no more likely to come back for a second summer than were students who did not have the special supports. …

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