Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

Cornell Medical College Saves Time and Money Via In-House Videodisc

Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

Cornell Medical College Saves Time and Money Via In-House Videodisc

Article excerpt

Cornell Medical College Saves Time and Money Via In-House Videodisc

At Cornell University's Medical College in Manhattan, first- and second-year students in such classes as pathophysiology, neuroscience and parasitology today have access to visual data not readily available to most of their predecessors. This is thanks, in large part, to videodisc technology and Dr. Steven Erde of the college's pathology department.

In 1985, Erde--a self-described "technical wizard/guru/maven"--initiated the PathMAC Lab in association with Dr. Daniel Alonso, now senior associate dean of the medical school. The idea was to produce a disc of images in-house, saving both time and money in comparison with the older method of sending discs out for mastering.

With only one company, Panasonic Industrial Co. of Secaucus, N.J., marketing WORM (write-once-read-many) discs, equipment selection was easy. The TQ-2026 optical memory disc recorder (OMDR) acquired is a laser-based optical recording and playback system that can record up to 24,000 still-picture frames or more than 13 minutes of full-motion video on a single disc. Players at the college now include Panasonic's TQ-2024, TQ-2025 and TQ-2027.

The videodisc created via the PathMAC Lab contains roughly 6,000 images, among them microscopic views of tissue, photographs of diseased and normal organs, X-rays, CT scans and pictures of parasites. …

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