Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

The Effects of Hard and Soft Landing Surfaces on Maximum Vertical Jumping Following Depth Jump Plyometric Exercise

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

The Effects of Hard and Soft Landing Surfaces on Maximum Vertical Jumping Following Depth Jump Plyometric Exercise

Article excerpt

Michael W. Olson, Colby College, Marilyn K. Miller, Bloomsburg University, and Thomas Kernozek and Travis Triplett-McBride, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

Plyometric exercises such as depth jumping and rebounding exercises have been used to increase vertical-jumping ability, however, due to the nature of the activity, lower extremity injuries sometimes occur from landing on the hard surface. The purpose of this study was to examine how landing surfaces used in plyometric depth jump exercises affected hip and knee angular kinematics at landing and takeoff, vertical ground reaction forces at landing, and flight times of maximal vertical jumps. Sixteen participants (8 male, 8 female), who were involved in recreational activities, performed ten depth jumps from a 61 cm height. Each landing, five onto a force platform (hard landing surface) and five onto a 2.35 cm thick foam mat (soft landing surface) placed on top of the force platform were followed by an explosive vertical jump for maximum height. Kinetic data were collected using a Bertec force platform interfaced to the Ariel Performance Analysis System (APAS). …

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