Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Anaerobic Capacity and Swimming Performances Following Recovery from Excessive Training

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Anaerobic Capacity and Swimming Performances Following Recovery from Excessive Training

Article excerpt

Tim Henrich, University of the Incarnate Word, Robert Pankey, Texas A & M University--Corpus Christi, and Bill Carleton, University of the Incarnate Word

Competitive swimmers in elite training programs are challenged with high training volumes of primarily aerobic training, often characterized as excessive, and hypothesized to reduce anaerobic energy reserves and be detrimental to performances. Our alternative hypothesis was that training volume reduction would result in recovery of anaerobic energy reserves as measured by the Wingate Bicycle Test (WBT) and supplement the aerobic adaptations known to result from high training volumes. This combination of metabolic adaptations should result in improved performances in events requiring both aerobic and anaerobic energy expenditure. Informed consent was obtained from a cohort of 12 female freshman swimmers (Mage = 13.9 years, SD = .7) with a documented history of 3 years of training 315 [+ or -] 23.5 min*[wk.sup.-1]. Their primary events required a combination of aerobic and anaerobic energy production. Following 6 posts of preseason training and familiarization WBT the participants initiated a water training pro gram where the daily training volume was increased form 6 to 13 K*[d.sup.-1] during a 6-post period which was maintained for a peak training period (PT) of 10 posts. PT was followed by 3 posts of decreased training (TAPER). Two WBT were given at the end of PT and following TAPER. …

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