Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Practice Schedule Effects on Learning the Golf Putt and Pitch

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Practice Schedule Effects on Learning the Golf Putt and Pitch

Article excerpt

Dennis Landin, Wes Grisham, and Brian Baum, Louisiana State University, and Edward P. Hebert, Southeastern Louisiana University

The motor learning literature contains an extensive body of research indicating that for most laboratory-based skills high contextual interference (CI) is superior to low CI. An interesting paradox exists in that while high CI degrades practice performance it produces greater learning. In sport settings there is evidence indicating that (a) the CI effect is mediated by the participant's skill level and (b) moderate levels of CI may be superior to high and low CI due to the complexity of most sport skills. Nearly ignored in CI research, whether from applied or laboratory settings, is how various practice schedules influence performance production measures (movement patterns). The purpose of this study was to compare three levels of CI on learning two golf skills (putt and pitch), measuring both performance outcomes and production. Participants (N = 24), inexperienced with golf, were taught the basics of the two strokes, practiced for 15 mm while receiving instructor feedback, and then performed a 20-trial bloc ked pretest. The next day 160 trials (80 per stroke) were performed under either low, moderate, or high CI. On the third day three, counterbalanced, 20-trial posttests (alternating, blocked, and random) were performed. Performance outcome data for practice and posttests were scores obtained from targets drawn on indoor golf surfaces. …

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