Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Attitudes toward Role Modeling Physical Activity and Fitness Promoting Behaviors in HPERD

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Attitudes toward Role Modeling Physical Activity and Fitness Promoting Behaviors in HPERD

Article excerpt

Bradley J. Cardinal, Oregon State University, and Marita K. Cardinal, Western Oregon University

For decades, a "do as I say, not as I do" physical activity paradox has been discussed within health, physical education, recreation, and dance (HPERD). This study contributes to this dialogue by describing the responses of 1,036 people to the "Attitude Toward Role Modeling Scale." The majority of respondents were members of a state HPERD association (53.1%), women (59.6%), Caucasian (89.4%), and either had earned or were working toward earning a physical education degree (62.3%). Participants evaluated all 16 statements on the Attitude Toward Role Modeling Scale (Likert format). Using a rank ordering of the mean scores obtained for each of the 16 items on the scale, several questions were considered. Is role modeling valued? Role modeling was viewed as a "powerful teaching tool" (ranked #1), followed by the need for HPERD personnel to "practice what they preach" (ranked #2). The importance of role modeling physical activity and fitness promoting behaviors and how this relates to one's effectiveness ranked lo wer (#5 and #8, respectively). For which professional disciplines are role modeling physical activity and fitness promoting behaviors important? This was viewed as a "desirable and recommended behavior" for personnel in each HPERD discipline (i. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.