Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Comparison of Taiwanese and American Physical Education Majors' Stereotyping of Physical Activities

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Comparison of Taiwanese and American Physical Education Majors' Stereotyping of Physical Activities

Article excerpt

Tracy L. Pellett, Minnesota State University, Mankato, Kuo-Chuan Tsai, Yuan-Peir College, Pao- Ling Chu, Hae-Ching Vocational School, Hsiao-Chuan Lei, Pa-Li Junior High School, and Tyler Travis and Chrissy DiMarzo, The Pennsylvania State University- Erie, The Behrend College

The importance of all individuals participating in both female and male-stereotyped activities is well accepted in the literature (Gilligan, 1982; Ignico & Mead, 1990). The examination of children's as well as parents' stereotyping of activities have also been extensively examined (Ignico & Mead, 1990; Pellett & Ignico, 1993). Boys tend to be consistently more stereotypical in their perceptions of activities across all ages. Stereotypical perceptions have been reported to diminish overtime, although it is specific to the environmental culture and forces (i.e., parents, teachers, school climate and curriculum) present. It should be noted that few studies have directly examined inservice or preservice teachers' stereotypical perceptions and compared these perceptions across cultures. Thus, the purpose of this study was to provide some insight into Taiwanese and American preservice physical education teachers' perceptions of the gender-appropriateness of activities. Participants for this study included 45 Taiwan ese and 30 American physical education majors in their junior year of their physical education teacher preparation program. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.