Academic journal article Journal of Environmental Health

Protective Headgear for Midwestern Agriculture: A Limited Wear Study

Academic journal article Journal of Environmental Health

Protective Headgear for Midwestern Agriculture: A Limited Wear Study

Article excerpt

* Baseball caps are popular with farm workers, but have been criticized because they do not sufficiently shade the face, neck, and ears.

* The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Worker Protection Standard for Agriculture requires a chemical-resistant hood or chemical-resistant hat with a wide brim for pesticide application if the pesticide label calls for head protection.

* In this study, four farm workers wore baseball caps and two alternative types of headgear with wide brims for 20 to 36 hours during planting of corn and soybeans.

* The purpose was to compare performance features and practicality for

-- a cotton twill baseball cap,

-- a tan Booney Solarweave [R] full-brimmed hat, and

-- a baseball cap with a Tyvek [R] cover.

* The authors also wanted to compare levels at which the following pesticides were deposited: acetochlor, ethalfuralin, metolachior, glyphosate, and 2,4-D.

* The workers agreed that the baseball cap was easiest to put on and had the best appearance, fit, and comfort.

* They also agreed that the baseball cap was worst at sun protection and repelling rain or spray. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.