Academic journal article Research-Technology Management

More Scientists Expected to Change Jobs

Academic journal article Research-Technology Management

More Scientists Expected to Change Jobs

Article excerpt

The proverbial greener pastures look greener these days. An August, 2000 survey of 2,000 working scientists and their managers found that 52 percent were certain they would leave their current employers during the next two years for better opportunities elsewhere.

The survey was sponsored by Kelly Scientific Resources, a temporary-staffing company headquartered in Troy, Michigan. The 2000 scientists were selected from a stratified random sample across the United States.

Respondents were asked for the main reason they wouldn't remain with their current employer. "I just expect better opportunity elsewhere," answered 22 percent, while 15 percent want better opportunity for promotion, 12 percent more money, and 9 percent more challenge.

The survey also revealed that for many scientists, their loyalty to their firm is strongly affected by the employer's willingness to assist them with job training and career development. Without such help, they will look for work elsewhere.

"As advances in technology grow, the demand for qualified and experienced science professionals also grows," said Roif E. Kleiner, senior vice president and general manager, Science and Healthcare Services Group, Kelly Services. "Science professionals are searching for and finding jobs with new employers with little difficulty. They're not leaving for a larger paycheck. Opportunity and challenge outweigh all other factors--including money--in determining career choices for most scientific professionals," Kleiner said. …

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