Academic journal article Human Ecology

The Legacy of Learning

Academic journal article Human Ecology

The Legacy of Learning

Article excerpt

"I am very proud of students who end up with minds of their own doing their own things. I've learned as much from them as they from me."

The mutual reward of teacher-student relationships comes when the life work of the teacher inspires the student to pursue and add to that field of study. In the field of human development, Professor Emeritus Urie Bronfenbrenner--known internationally as a founder of the national Head Start program and for his pioneering research on the crucial role that social context plays in the development of young children--not only has had a major and significant influence himself but has propelled his students to make their own marks in the field as leaders, scholars, researchers, and teachers.

ANN C. CROUTER Ph.D. '82 is a professor of human development and co-director of the graduate program in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies at Pennsylvania State University, where she conducts federally funded longitudinal research on the impact of work on families and children. While at Cornell she became interested in the interconnections between parent's work lives and their family lives, an interest that continues. In 1999 she received Penn State's President's Award for Excellence in Academic Integration of Research, Teaching, and Service.

"Urie had and continues to hate a profound influence on the wgy I think, the way I formulate research questions, the way I write, and the way I interact with my graduate students. When I was in graduate school, Urie's influential book The Ecology of Human Development: Experiments by Nature and Design was just coming out. The exciting combination of reading that book, taking Urie's class "Development in Context, "and meeting with him regularly drove those important ideas deep into my consciousness. Now I see Urie's impact in everything I do, and I continue to he very proud of the fact that lam a 'Bronfenbrenner student.

JAMES GARBARINO Ph.D. '73 returned to the college to teach in 1994 and is now the E. L. Vincent Professor of Human Development and director of the Family Life Development Center. Garbarino conducted first-ever studies on how socially toxic environments--be they war zones overseas or blighted inner city neighborhoods here at home--poison children's development and well-being, producing young people at ever greater risk for perpetuating the vicious cycle of poverty and violence. …

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