Academic journal article Australian Aboriginal Studies

Editorial

Academic journal article Australian Aboriginal Studies

Editorial

Article excerpt

This issue of the journal maintains the diversity of articles published in Australian Aboriginal Studies: and concomitantly reveals the depth and breadth of Indigenous Studies in Australia. We have an article by Mitchell Rolls which discusses the literary work of James Cowan, critically examining his construction of Aborigines and the claims he makes about the Aboriginal metaphysical realm in light of a literary genre that is emerging in which Aborigines are cast as saviours of the supposedly alienated Western self.

Cora Thomas, a historian, argues that there is a general inadequacy of published research on the historical specificity of Australia's culturalist or assimilation policies and, in particular, on the ideas of Paul (later Sir Paul) Hasluck. As Federal Minister for Territories in the 1950s and early 1960s, the high point of assimilationism in Australia, Hasluck was the main architect of these policies as they directly affected Aboriginal people in the Northern Territory and was in a coordinating and influential role over the state authorities at that time. This article is especially pertinent in light of the continuing debate about child removal and stolen generations.

Jack Brook reviews the evidence of Bennelong's travelling companion, Yem-mer-ra-wannie, who was the youth who `voluntarily and cheerfully' left his native shores with Bennelong aboard the Atlantic on 11 December 1792 on their voyage of adventure. …

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