Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

Education Act Sets Stage for Technology Reform. (the Final Word)

Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

Education Act Sets Stage for Technology Reform. (the Final Word)

Article excerpt

Editors'note: This is the first in an occasional series of articles on federal and state issues that will affect educators who use technology.

On Jan. 8, 2002, President George W. Bush signed the Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act passed by Congress. This bill, supported by both Democrats and Republicans, provides additional federal money to schools, especially those serving students from low-income families. Amid all the media coverage of the accountability provisions, especially the requirement to test all students in grades 3-8 in reading and math, other components of the bill have gone unnoticed. Among the unnoticed is a significant change in both size -- more money-- and direction -- more requirements -- of support from the federal government for technology. As of press time, the exact amount of money per state had not yet been determined, but overall there is more money for technology than in past budgets. It is also important to note that the rules implementing this bill have not yet been created either at the federal or state level, so the specifics of how it will affect your district are not yet known.

There are responsibilities for everyone. The U.S. Department of Education will conduct research on the conditions and practices under which educational technology is effective in increasing student achievement, and it will create a national education technology plan. As part of their application for funds under this act, states will submit a statewide long-range strategic educational technology plan that must address 15 components, many of which describe the proposed uses of the technology-related money. Among these uses are to raise student achievement, provide courses through distance learning, ensure teachers and administrators are technologically literate, and increase parental involvement.

States also ate to flow money to the schools. Approximately half of the technology-related money going to a state will flow through to schools using the same formula as their Title I basic program money. …

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