Academic journal article Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Additional Resources Will Mean Better Health. (Round Table)

Academic journal article Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Additional Resources Will Mean Better Health. (Round Table)

Article excerpt

There is no doubt in my mind that developing countries should increase their investments in their health sectors, a key component of moves to increase the quality of life and reduce the poverty of their citizens as well as to promote economic growth. For too long, a high burden of preventable disease has been a major handicap to the economic performance of poor countries, especially in Africa, as well as taking a high human toll on their populations. In addition to the perennial problems that Africa suffers from malaria, tuberculosis, malnutrition and vaccine-preventable childhood diseases, it is also the region worst affected by the global HIV/AIDS pandemic, which is killing millions of its people, reversing a generation-long trend of increased life expectancy, and seriously harming economic prospects. Overcoming the diseases of poverty will be an essential and significant step towards meeting Africa's international development goals.

Over the past decade, both public and private expenditure on health have increased in Africa. As a percentage of GDP, the continent's health expenditure approximates the global average. But in objective terms, the amounts involved remain far too small, especially in view of the costs of treating HIV/AIDS, even with the recent welcome reductions in the price of antiretroviral treatments. There is a general consensus that Africa needs a major increase in investment in health sector development.

I am optimistic that the required new resources, as recommended by the Report of the Commission on Macroeconomics and Health, will be made available, will be well spent, and will achieve large and sustainable improvements in health. Many African countries accept the need to mobilize more resources, and it is a matter of principle and effectiveness that the first dollar in additional spending should come from domestic rather than donor sources. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.