Academic journal article Chicago Review

Stan Brakhage: Four Silent Nights

Academic journal article Chicago Review

Stan Brakhage: Four Silent Nights

Article excerpt

Although American avant-gardist Stan Brakhage has achieved a level of expression comparable with more known contemplative filmmakers such as Ozu or Antonioni, he has remained a marginal figure. Greatness sometimes takes longer than artistic fashion will allow. By the time that Brakhage, who has been making films since 1952, began to make his most deeply felt and profoundly elegant visual work, he had virtually lost his audience. During the last fourteen years, interspersed among a variety of ventures into sound filmmaking, Brakhage has produced a body of silent work of fragile beauty that directly address our need for an intimate, tender, and prayerful cinema.

This work, which we bring together on four nights during July, leaves behind the director's previous concerns with myth and family and centers on an upstream area of poetic exploration closest to the pinpoint of mind where light, spirit, and body come upon one another. Cinema so rarely touches upon this "original place" that the viewer's only difficulty might be in trying to "read" these films-to conceptualize them into a literary film language-and therefore miss the joy of their direct and passionate play upon our metabolism. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.