Academic journal article Academic Exchange Quarterly

Editorial

Academic journal article Academic Exchange Quarterly

Editorial

Article excerpt

As teachers, we all do scholarship, whether it is publishing, presenting, preparing lectures, or formulating lesson plans. Scholarship enriches our classroom presentations and allows us to speak with confidence about our subjects. We become familiar with current scholarship in our disciplines and consider its implications. We often must revise our thinking because of new scholarship. That is why we are considered to be "teacher-scholars." The two activities go hand-in-hand.

We share the fruits of our scholarship with our peers in the marketplace of ideas. Conversely, our colleagues share their ideas and criticisms, leading us to refine our thinking. This refinement fosters growth of new knowledge.

What is not so often realized is how our own scholarship enriches the education of our students. I do not mean by that the obvious fact that we impart new knowledge to our students. I mean that the students themselves benefit from scholarship by learning more and asking enriched questions. Information does not flow in one direction; the teacher does not simply provide instruction grounded in research. The students respond with questions that indicate their own understanding of the subject based on their learning and thinking. The quality of their learning is enhanced. No instruction is static when backed by scholarship; no learning is stymied when exposed to it.

Scholarship and learning create an ongoing dialogue between teachers and learners. …

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