Academic journal article Journal of Environmental Health

An Assessment of Lead Exposure Potential from Residential Cutoff Valves. (Practical Stuff!)

Academic journal article Journal of Environmental Health

An Assessment of Lead Exposure Potential from Residential Cutoff Valves. (Practical Stuff!)

Article excerpt

This department, "Practical Stuff!" originated from you, our readers, via your responses on "Tell Us What You Think" forms. Many of you have expressed to us that one of the main reasons you read the Journal of Environmental Health is to glean practical and useful information for your everyday work-related activities. In response to your feedback, we dedicate this section to you with salient points to remember about two features in each issue.

* Tap water continues to represent 14 to 20 percent of total lead exposure for U.S. residents.

* Until recently, nearly all household kitchen and bathroom faucets were constructed of 2 to 7 percent leaded brass.

* These faucets leach high amounts of lead into residential drinking water when new and, in many cases, even after years of use.

* In 1995, all major U.S. faucet manufacturers agreed to phase out the use of leaded-brass alloys in faucets by the end of 1999.

* Nearly all were in compliance by the end of 1997.

* But virtually all residential brass water meters installed in the United States are made of 5 or 7 percent leaded brass.

* These meters leach significant amounts of lead into drinking water when new.

* If the composition of the water is corrosive, the leaching continues after many years.

* A lawsuit filed in California led to an August 1999 settlement under which the nine major U. …

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