Academic journal article Journal of Environmental Health

Attitudes about Electric and Magnetic Fields: Do Scientists and Other Risk Experts Perceive Risk Similarly? (Practical Stuff!)

Academic journal article Journal of Environmental Health

Attitudes about Electric and Magnetic Fields: Do Scientists and Other Risk Experts Perceive Risk Similarly? (Practical Stuff!)

Article excerpt

* Power lines, electrical wiring, and electrical equipment all produce extremely low frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMFs).

* Turning on a light switch, using electrical appliances, and turning off an alarm clock are examples of EMF exposure sources.

* EMFs create weak electric currents in the bodies of people and animals.

* Usually, the current is too weak to penetrate cell membranes and exists only between the cells.

* The EMF-created current is lower in intensity than the background noise of the body's own natural currents.

* For that reason, some scientists argue that it is impossible for EMFs to have any important effects,

* Nevertheless, some studies have raised questions about possible adverse health effects.

* Just as a trained ear can pick up a familiar voice in a crowd, they suggest, so a cell might respond to an induced current as a signal.

* The National Academy of Sciences and the National Cancer Institute have found no convincing evidence that exposure to electric power lines and electric power appliances are a threat to human health.

* The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the U. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.