Academic journal article Mosaic (Winnipeg)

Introduction

Academic journal article Mosaic (Winnipeg)

Introduction

Article excerpt

Tradition challenges innovation. It is composed of successive graftings.-de Llano and Castanheira, Alvaro Siza: Works and Projects

As if anticipating the Guggenheim Bilbao, Roland Barthes once ventured that a universally recognizable architectural signifier (he was referring to the Eiffel Tower) remains forever, ineluctably, open to meaning-making. And not only that, suggests Dina Smith in her essay in this issue: the "complicated structure of meanings" attached to an architectural project such as the Guggenheim museum "illustrates the aesthetic and economic interconnectedness of local and global spaces." At times, Smith says in "The Narrative Limits of the Global Guggenheim," this interconnectedness makes for a kind of "collision" that can "affect and alter that which seeks to displace or absorb it." Matters of migration, and of interrelation, are anything but easy. Maybe that is what this issue is about.

Frank Gehry might make you think that it is easier for a building, than for a book, to transcend the limits of the right angle. (Gehry, says Richard Serra, "is the first to really break with the orthodoxy of the right angle" [qtd. in Bechtler 29]). With this special issue of Mosaic, however, we are also caught up in the process of transforming ingrained structures, spaces, and boundary lines. With this issue, we give you a new Mosaic format: a more elegant, simpler, and coherent design, open to greater diversity. …

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