Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

The September Review.

Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

The September Review.

Article excerpt

Longitudinal data about jobs in business establishments allow a more nuanced examination of the process of aggregate employment growth and decline. Jason Faberman takes advantage of data from the relatively new BLS Longitudinal Database to study employment trends in metropolitan areas in the States of Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania--the heart of what in the early 1980s was labeled the Rust Belt.

After dividing the 35 areas into three equal groups according to their employment growth rates, Faberman makes some interesting findings. Among them, the growth rates, with only one exception, were indeed growth rates--positive net changes. Second, the highest third had not only the highest job creation rate, but also the highest job destruction rate. Also, the average age of establishments was a little younger, on average, in the faster-growing third of metropolitan areas.

Harriet B. Presser and Barbara Altman explore the 1996 household section of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to look for differences in the incidence of "non-standard" shifts--evening, night, or rotating--between workers with differing disability statuses. They conclude that "persons with disabilities are participating in the 24-hour economy to the same extent as those without disabilities." Women with severe disabilities are somewhat less likely than other groups to work a non-standard shift. …

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