Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Influence of the Direction of an Approaching Stimulus on Concident Timing. (Motor Behavior)

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Influence of the Direction of an Approaching Stimulus on Concident Timing. (Motor Behavior)

Article excerpt

In many skills requiring coincident timing, a stimulus can approach a performer from a number of directions. Examining the influence of stimulus direction on coincident timing Payne (1987) found that significantly less error resulted when a stimulus approached performers directly from the front as opposed to either the left or right sides. Recently however, Williams et al (2001) found that the coincident timing error of simple movements, such as a finger press task, were significantly less than for larger, more complex movements. Given that the task used in Payne's study was a simple finger press task, further exploration into the influence of stimulus direction using more complex tasks is warranted. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of direction of an approaching stimulus on the coincident timing of a ballistic string task. Twenty-six right-hand dominant participants performed a 60cm horizontal arm motion to displace a wooden barrier in coincidence with the final light in a series that traveled down a runway. Twenty trials were randomly performed at each of two stimulus velocities, 4 and 8 mph, which approached from either the left or the right of the participant. …

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