Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Divided Attention Costs for Speeded and Nonspeeded Secondary Tasks to near and Far Targets. (Motor Behavior)

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Divided Attention Costs for Speeded and Nonspeeded Secondary Tasks to near and Far Targets. (Motor Behavior)

Article excerpt

Previously, Fischman, Kinley, and Lane (1999) found that reaction times (RTs) to a primary task were slowed when paired with a nonspeeded secondary task. This finding was not replicated in a subsequent experiment (Dornier & Reeve, 2001). One difference between the experiments was the distance of the secondary target from the start key (approximately 6 in. and 20 in., respectively). Additionally, in neither experiment was movement time (MT) directly measured, thus it was not possible to verify movement differences. The purpose of the present experiment was to extend previous research in examining possible causes for the discrepancy in results. Participants were asked to perform speeded and nonspeeded movements to near (5 inches from the start key) and far (15 inches from the start key) targets. Both RTs and MTs were measured. Twenty-four participants participated in five conditions containing 20 trials each. The five conditions were (a) simple finger lift without the grasping movement, (b) speeded movement to a near target, (c) speeded movement to afar target, (d) nonspeeded movement to a near target, and (e) nonspeeded movement to far target. Order of conditions was counterbalanced across participants. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.