Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

What Drives Children's Limb Selection for Reaching in Hemispace? (Motor Behavior)

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

What Drives Children's Limb Selection for Reaching in Hemispace? (Motor Behavior)

Article excerpt

Arguably, the act of reaching constitutes one of the most devoted lines of contemporary developmental research. In addition to the underlying dynamical characteristics of motor coordination, a key element in programming is limb selection; a phenomenon [handedness] that has so far resisted any reasonable unified explanation. Traditionally, it has been assumed that if an individual truly preferred a particular hand, he or she would likely use that limb to carry out an array of unimanual activities, even in awkward positions; in essence, the definition of limb dominance. From a more contemporary view, two factors appear to have the most influence on hand selection for a given task: motor dominance and attentional information related to task demands. This study was designed to determine what factor(s) influence choice of limb for reaching in hemispace in reference to motor dominance, object proximity, and a hemispheric bias favoring use of the hand on the same side as the stimulus. Strong right-handed children (6 -8-year-olds) were blindfolded and asked to reach and retrieve a small object across right and left hemispace locations beginning with the arms uncrossed and arms crossed. Order of stimulus position was systematically given using a computer-generated list of random positions, counterbalanced between participants. …

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