Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Archbishop Theodore: Commemorative Studies on His Life and Influence

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Archbishop Theodore: Commemorative Studies on His Life and Influence

Article excerpt

Archbishop Theodore: Commemorative Studies on His Life and Influence. Edited by Michael Lapidge [Cambridge Studies in Anglo-Saxon England, 11.] (New York: Cambridge University Press. 1995. Pp. xiii, 349.)

Theodore of Tarsus, archbishop of Canterbury (668-690) was commemorated by a seminar of experts in Cambridge on the thirteen hundredth anniversary of his death. The appointment by Pope Agatho of a sixty-year-old Greek monk with Syriac connections has always seemed bizarre. In the event the choice was a triumphant success. Theodore established a school at Canterbury second only to that based on Jarrow and Wearmouth in Northumbria, a superiority largely dependent on one name, Bede. This book is the result of that seminar together with extra papers supplied later. The book is scholarship at its most austere, but it is pervaded by a sense of barely suppressed excitement in almost all the contributions. Professor Lapidge puts it in his preface (p. viii):"It very quickly became clear from the discussion at the symposium that wholly new-indeed revolutionary-awareness was emerging of the role which Theodore had played in transmitting Greek learning to the Latin West and the establishment of higher education in Anglo-Saxon England. The foundations of this new awareness were twofold: the demonstration that the vast body of scholarship preserved in the so-called `Leiden family' of glossaries had its origin in the school of Theodore and Hadrian at Canterbury; and the imminent publication of the biblical commentaries to the Pentateuch and gospels which were similarly produced in that school. Together these previously untapped sources revealed an enormous range of learning in Greek and Latin patristic literature as well as expertise in scholarly disciplines otherwise scarcely known in the Latin West at that time." Dr. Lapidge does not overstate his case. Richard Marsden gives a study of Theodore's Bible: the Pentateuch both learned (very) and penetrating. Jane Stevenson and Carmella Vircillo Franklin convincingly identify Theodore as the author of two rare but important texts. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.