Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Schottenkloster: Irische Benediktinerkonvente Im Hochmittelalterlichen Deutschland

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Schottenkloster: Irische Benediktinerkonvente Im Hochmittelalterlichen Deutschland

Article excerpt

Schottenkloster: Irische Benediktinerkonvente im hochmittelalterlichen Deutschland. By Helmut Flachenecker. [Quellen und Forschungen aus dem Gebiet der Geschichte, Neue Folge, Volume 18.] (Paderborn: Ferdinand Schoningh. 1995. Pp. 402. DM 48,- paperbound.)

Anyone who has spent some time in Vienna has seen the Schottenkloster, the only still-functioning, former abbey of Irish Benedictines in the German-speaking world. The Schotten have been the subject of considerable scholarly as well as popular misinformation, caused in part by the fact that the high-medieval Scoti were Irish, but that three of the monasteries were assigned to exiled Scottish Catholics in the sixteenth century. However, the real reason for the confusion lies in the sources themselves. Few documents survive, and the historian is thus forced to rely on the Vita S. Mariani, written shortly after 1180, a century after the "founder's" death, and the Libellus de fundacione ecclesiae Consecrati Petri, drafted in the 1250's. Both are highly tendentious and inaccurate works that were designed to bolster the claim of the abbot of St. James in Regensburg to be the head of the congregation of Irish monks. These high-medieval sources must be supplemented with necrologies, the oldest of which dates only to the fifteenth century, and with suspect early modern histories of the monasteries. The latter propagated the erroneous view that the abbeys were founded by Scots, who were replaced in the fourteenth century by Irish monks who were responsible for the houses' rapid decline. Helmut Flachenecker has sifted through this material to reconstruct the history of the Schotten during the fourth and last phase of Irish monasticism on the Continent.

After a brief stay in Bamberg, Marianus and his companions, who were on a pilgrimage to Rome, decided in 1070 to remain in Regensburg. King Henry IV took under his protection in 1089 the community of Irish hermits who lived at the church of Weih Sankt Peter. A second community formed at St. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.