Academic journal article Military Review

The Polish Underground Army, the Western Allies, and the Failure of Strategic Unity in World War II

Academic journal article Military Review

The Polish Underground Army, the Western Allies, and the Failure of Strategic Unity in World War II

Article excerpt

THE POLISH UNDERGROUND ARMY, THE WESTERN ALLIES, AND THE FAILURE OF STRATEGIC UNITY IN WORLD WAR II, Michael Alfred Peszke, McFarland & Company, Inc., Jefferson, NC, 2005, 244 pages, $45.00.

A discussion of Polish military involvement in World War II usually brings to mind Germany's lightning campaign of 1939 or Polish General Stanislaw Sosabowski's paratroopers' role in Operation MarketGarden. In The Polish Underground Army, the Western Allies, and the Failure of Strategic Unity in World War II, Michael A. Peszke evaluates Poland's integration into and contribution to the Allied strategic effort. He examines national strategies and how exiled Polish leaders labored for years to assimilate themselves favorably into the Allied war effort. With the establishment of a communist government in Poland under Soviet authority, however, and despite the exertion and sacrifice of thousands of Poles, the labor was in vain.

Peszke asserts that at the beginning of the war the Polish cause was far from hopeless. But, in 1943, the "year of ever-increasing disasters," the fortunes of Western Poles declined precipitously. …

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