Academic journal article Journalism History

Media at War: Radio's Challenge to the Newspapers, 1924-1939

Academic journal article Journalism History

Media at War: Radio's Challenge to the Newspapers, 1924-1939

Article excerpt

Jackaway, Gwenyth. Media at War: Radio's Challenge to the Newspapers, 192-1939. Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 1995. 184 pp. $49.95.

Media at War is, in author Gwenyth Jackaway's words, "an exploration of the nature of conflicts between established and emerging media." The conflict explored here is the Press-Radio War that began in the mid-1920s and continued in varying degrees of intensity until 1939. At issue was the use made of wire service news by fledgling radio networks and local radio stations, and the objections to such use by powerful entities within the newspaper industry.

Jackaway divides Media at War into five chapters and an epilogue. Chapter one examines resistance by established media to the arrival of new media, chapter two chronicles the various stages of the PressRadio War and gives flesh to some of the more significant "flashpoints" as the war progressed, and the final three chapters examine in detail the reasons for the war.

She cites perceived threats to institutional identity, structure and function as the main contributing factors to why newspaper executives attempted for so long to exert pressure on the Associated Press to prohibit and then, failing that, to limit radio access to its news. The book's epilogue uses the Press-Radio War as a model that presaged a series of similar battles between old (i.e., established) and new media that would erupt with some degree of regularity during the latter half of this century. …

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