Academic journal article Social Security Bulletin

Supplementary Social Security Agreement with German Enters into Force

Academic journal article Social Security Bulletin

Supplementary Social Security Agreement with German Enters into Force

Article excerpt

A new Social Security agreement between the United States and Germany entered into force on May I, 1996. The agreement, which was signed in March 1995, amends an earlier Social Security agreement between the two countries that has been in force since December 1, 1979. The original agreement coordinates the two countries' Social Security programs by eliminating dual Social Security coverage and taxation and by filling gaps in benefit protection for workers who have divided their careers between the United States and Germany.

The supplementary agreement updates and clarifies several provisions in the original agreement. Its primary purpose, however, is to permit the payment of German benefits to certain Germanspeaking Jews who migrated to the United States from parts of Eastern Europe that were overrun by the Nazis. People who qualify will receive monthly social security benefits from Germany based on the time they spent working in their former homelands, even though they may never have worked in Germany. German social security officials have estimated that about 10,000 U.S. residents could become entitled to additional German benefits as a result of this supplementary agreement.

To be eligible for the new benefits, which can be paid as far back as July 1, 1990, claimants must pay contributions to the German social security system. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.