Academic journal article ABNF Journal

The Darkest Child

Academic journal article ABNF Journal

The Darkest Child

Article excerpt

Delores Phillips The Darkest Child New York, NY: Soho Press, Inc., 2004, pp. 387.

This textbook was selected by the Hampton University School of Liberal Arts and Education Read-In Committee to be read and discussed by the Hampton University community. Abuse and neglect can have negative consequences for children, families, and society that have lasting effects. Family abuse is often perpetuated through the generations by a cycle of violence. "The Darkest Child" written by Delores Phillips, is detailed with captivating stories of racial tension and family violence while illuminating a vicious cycle of transgenerational abuse. As readers deconstruct aspects of this novel, they will ponder the psychological and personal ramifications for victims and villains. This book is written by an African American nurse who is able to provide unique insights from nursing into the consequences of abuse as well as shed light on aspects of African American culture that may be unfamiliar to many in health care.

From the intimate perspective of Tangy Mae, the novel's main character, the book provides a realistic example of psychological scarring that can occur from years of living under the shadows of past traumatic experiences. Out of the shadows of abuse, an intrapsychic conflict of guilt and shame can lead to many psychological indicators. Abuse and neglect (physical, verbal, emotional, mental, and sexual) permeate the novel.

In the novel, the Quinn children were neglected and abused physically, psychologically, and sexually. The mother in the novel, Rozelle, neglected her children in every manner. Two of the children, Tangy Mae and Wallace, discussed their hunger during the lunch hours at school. Rozelle refused to allow Tangy Mae to attend school and refused to touch, feed, or look at the infant Judy. Rozelle also allowed one of her children, Tarabelle, to suffer with an infection, until Tarabelle's friend Pearl intervened. The author describes a graphic portrayal of abuse suffered by the character Martha Jean.

Martha Jean's face was a horrid rainbow of black lumps and blue bruises encircled by thin rings of lime-green and yellow discolorations. She peered at me from beneath the swollen, black lid of her right eye. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.