Academic journal article Medium Aevum

Geistliches in Weltlicher Und Weltliches in Geistlicher Literatur Des Mittlealters

Academic journal article Medium Aevum

Geistliches in Weltlicher Und Weltliches in Geistlicher Literatur Des Mittlealters

Article excerpt

Geistliches in welticher und Weltiches in geistlicher Literatur des Mittelalters, ed. Christoph Huber, Burghart Wachinger, and Hans-Joachim Ziegeler (Tubingen: Niemeyer, 2000). vi + 348 pp. ISBN 3-484-64015-4. DM 156.00.

The theme of this volume, the proceedings of a symposium held at Heiligkreuztal in 1997, fits well into recent tendencies in scholarship, long overdue, to break down a series of absolute antitheses in favour of a historically more plausible focus on their interplay. Accordingly, stress is now laid more on the role of both clerics and laymen at court and in the production and reception of court literature, on the long-lasting symbiosis of orality with literacy, on the interlocking of history and fiction, and, in linguistic terms, on the mutual influence of Latin and vernacular. This volume deals similarly with the interpenetration of the secular and spiritual spheres in what Burghart Wachinger terms the `geistlich-weltliche Mischkultur des Mittelalters'.

Of the fifteen contributions in this volume reasons of space lead me to mention only some, chosen because of the importance or interest of the problems they raise. Benedikt Vollmann discusses `concealed secularism' in the legend, in other words the survival and transformation of classical secular themes derived from the Hellenistic romance. Elke BrUggen's theme is the way in which pastoral concern for those living in the world led to an assimilation of certain aspects of the world by clerical authors. Peter Godman treats of the Archpoet, active at the court of an archbishop elect with worldly interests and using linguistic ambiguity to conduct clerical arguments for political purposes. For Eckart Lutz the focus is two other courts (Henry II in London and Heinrich der Lowe in Braunschweig) and the legitimization of their rule with arguments from salvation history (more striking in the Rolandslied than in Chretien's Erec). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.